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Current


Toril Johannessen
SKOGSAKEN (The Forest Case)

Coming up


Lina Viste Grønli
Nye skulpturer


Maria Brinch
Inya Lake


Exhibitions
— 2019



Marysia Lewandowska It’s About Time (in Venice Biennial)


Films by
Mai Hofstad Gunnes



Isme Film
Collectively Conscious Remembrance



Trond Lossius
Jeremy Welsh
The Atmospherics
River deep, mountain high



Exhibitions 
— 2018



Marjolijn Dijkman
Toril Johannessen
Reclaiming Vision

Damir Avdagic
Reenactment/Process
Reprise/Response


Eivind Egeland
Father of Evil

Marysia Lewandowska
Rehearsing the Museum


Anton Vidokle
Immortality for All: a film trilogy on
Russian Cosmism

Curated by
Ingrid Haug Erstad

Johanna Billing
Pulheim Jam Session,
I’m Gonna Live Anyhow Until I die,
I’m Lost Without Your Rhythm, This is How We Walk on the Moon,
Magical World


Jenine Marsh
Kneading Wheel, 
Coins and Tokens

Jenine Marsh
Sofia Eliasson
Lasse Årikstad
Johanna Lettmayer
Lewis & Taggar
Jon Benjamin Tallerås
Orientering 
—  a group show in public space


Jon Rafman
Dream Journal
2016-2017


Goutam Ghosh &
Jason Havneraas
PAARA

Ian Giles
After BUTT

Films by Yafei Qi
Wearing The Fog, 
I Wonder Why, 
Life Tells Lies

Exhibitions
— 2017

Daniel Gustav Cramer
Five Days

Kamilla Langeland
Sjur Eide Aas
The Thinker, Flower Pot and Mush

Danilo Correale
Equivalent Unit
Reverie: On the Liberation from Work


Valentin Manz
Useful Junk

Jeannine Han
Dan Riley
Time Flies When Slipping Counter-Clockwise

Pedro Gómez-Egaña
Pleasure

Ane Graff
Mattering Waves


Andrew Amorim
Lest We Perish

Tom S. Kosmo
Unnatural Selection

Jenine Marsh
Lindsay Lawson

Dear Stranger


Exhibitions
— 2016


ALBUM
Eline Mugaas
Elise Storsveen
How to Feel Like a Woman

DKUK (Daniel Kelly)
Presents: Jóhanna Ellen
Digital Retreat Dot Com

Cato Løland
Folded Lines, Battles and Events

Harald Beharie
Louis Schou-Hansen
(S)kjønn safari 2.0

Lynda Benglis
On Screen
Bergen Assembly

Linn Pedersen
Bjørn Mortensen
Terence Koh
NADA New York

Ida Nissen
Kamilla Langeland
Marthe Elise Stramrud
Christian Tunge
Eivind Egeland
Fading Forms

Anders Holen
Stimulus

Sinta Werner
Vanishing Lines

Exhibitions
— 2015


Bjørn Mortensen
Pouches and Pockets
/ Compositories in Color


Linn Pedersen
Plain Air

Øystein Klakegg
Entrée # 55

Leander Djønne
Petroglyphs of the Indebted Man

Lewis & Taggart
Black Holes and other painted objects


Azar Alsharif
Bjørn Mortensen
Steinar Haga Kristensen
Lewis & Taggart
Vilde Salhus Røed
Heidi Bjørgan
NADA New York

Linda Sormin
Heidi Bjørgan
Collision

Steinar Haga Kristensen
The Fundamental Part of Any Act

Exhibitions
—2014


Tora Endestad Bjørkheim
Bjørn-Henrik Lybeck


Mathijs van Geest
The passenger eclipsed the object that I could have seen otherwise

Marit Følstad
Sense of Doubt

Oliver Laric
Yuanmingyuan3D

Terence Koh
sticks, stones and bones 

Kristin Tårnesvik
Espen Sommer Eide
Korsmos ugressarkiv

Exhibitions
— 2013


André Tehrani
Lost Allusions


Pedro Gómez-Egaña
Object to be Destroyed


Flag New York City

Christian von Borries
I’m M
Institute of Political Hallucinations
Bergen Assembly

Dillan Marsh
June Twenty-First

Vilde Salhus Røed
For the Sake of Colour


Azar Alsharif
The distant things seem close (…) the close remote (…) the air is loaded


Magnhild Øen Nordahl
Omar Johnsen
Trialog

Lars Korff Lofthus
New Work

Exhibitions
— 2012


Anngjerd Rustan
The Dust Will Roll Together

Cato Løland
Oliver Pietsch
Love is Old, Love is New

Stian Ådlandsvik
Abstract Simplicity of Need

Sinta Werner
Something that stands for Something / Double Described Tautologies

Kjersti Vetterstad
Lethargia

Anna Lundh
Grey Zone

Arne Rygg
Borghild Rudjord Unneland
Lisa Him-Jensen
Cato Løland
Lewis & Taggart
Klara Sofie Ludvigsen
Magnhild Øen Nordahl
Mathijs van Geest
Andrea Spreafico
Flag Bergen

Exhibitions
— 2011


Karen Skog & Mia Øquist
Skog & Øquist systematiserer

Danilo Correale
We Are Making History

Sveinung Rudjord Unneland
U.T.

Ethan Hayes-Chute
Make/Shifted Cabin

Ebba Bohlin
Per-Oskar Leu
Kaia Hugin
Pica Pica

Gabriel Kvendseth
First We Take Mannahatta

Roger von Reybekiel
Do Everything Fantastic

Exhibitions
— 2010



Michael Johansson
27m3

Tone Wolff Kalstad
This Color Is Everywhere


Knud Young Lunde
Road Show Event Plan


Alison Carey
Ivan Twohig
Benjamin Gaulon
On The In-Between


Mercedes Mühleisen
Øyvind Aspen
Birk Bjørlo
Damir Avdagic
Annette Stav Johanssen
If Everything Else Fails...

Mart
Ciara Scanlan
Matthew Nevin
An Instructional

Patrick Wagner
Nina Nowak
Samuel Seger Patricia Wagner
South of No North

Gandt
Agnes Nedregaard Midskills
Patrick Coyle
Boogey Boys Santiago Mostyn
Bergen Biennale 2010 by Ytter

Lars Korff Lofthus
West Norwegian Pavilion


Serina Erfjord
Repeat


Mattias Arvastsson
Presence No.5


Malin Lennström-Örtwall
It`s like Nothing Ever Happened

Exhibitions
— 2009


Tor Navjord
FM/AM

Ragnhild Johansen
Erased Knot Painting


Entrée Radio


Lewis and Taggart
Ledsagende lydspor


In Conversation:
Gómez-Egaña and Mathijs van Geest


In Conversation:
Andrew Amorim and Mitch Speed


In Conversation:
Ane Graff and Alex Klein


In Conversation:
Martin Clark and Daniel Kelly


Ludo Sounds with
Tori Wrånes




In Conversation:
Stine Janvin Motland, Kusum Normoyle, Mette Rasmussen, Cara Stewart



Randi Grov Berger
Contact/Info/CV
Other projects







Mark
January 21th- February 26th, 2012

Anna Lundh

Grey Zone



Actress Randi Brænne next to the speaking clock (Telefonuret) to which she lent her voice, Bergen 1941.



Anna Lundh (b.1979) is a Swedish artist, based in Stockholm and New York. Much like a detective or archaeologist she is investigating cultural phenomena, social agreements, language and technology.

The work shown at Entrée is concerning our personal and social relationships to the concept of time. Lundh has for several years run a research project to collect individual reflections and visual perceptions of time, which are partly presented in the video work The Year is a Python that swallowed an Elephant. From the Swedish Television archive Lundh has collected ”wait-time” (a ticking clock between programs) spanning from 1983-93; for example 16:50:08 - 16:55:00, August 28th 1990. Included is also her latest project New Years Eve (GMT -0:30), where she created a unique time zone for the gallery space Platform Sthlm, 1,5 hours behind local time. Research for the current exhibition Grey zone has now led her to Frøken Ur´s lost recordings…

Anna Lundh graduated from Konstfack in 2008 and has since participated in residency programs such as LMCC Workspace, New York and Omi International Arts Center. Lundh has exhibited at Bonniers Konsthall, Haninge Konsthall, Rhizome, Marian Spore, Apexart and Franklin Street Works to name a few and also published text-based works for Squid, Hjärnstorm and Triple Canopy.
www.annalundh.com

Lecture performance by Anna Lundh Friday January 20th at 21.00, offering insight into her research project The Year is a Python that swallowed an Elephant.



Frøken Ur. Ongoing research concerning Norways first “speaking clock”, installed in Bergen in 1935. Presented here on an overhead lamp. 2012–




Tv time, Video (1.53.53, loop)
Selected sections from The Swedish Television broadcast archive. 2010












The Year is a Python that swallowed an Elephant, video (silent, 12.12 loop). Based on the data collected in a research project/experiment performed with 150 people in Stockholm and New York. 2009–




Lecture Performance offering insight into the project The Year is a Python that swallowed an Elephant for the opening night January 20th at 21.00-21.30.








The Year is a Python that swallowed an Elephant, Video with voiceover (13.55 loop). Based on the data collected in a research project/experiment performed with 150 people in Stockholm and New York. 2009–







New Years Eve (GMT -0:30)
A project by Anna Lundh
hosted by Evening standard/Platform Stockholm 31/12 2011


A singular moment in the history of efforts to unite the world under a western-dominated capitalist model was the introduction of uniform time zones at the 1884 Washington Meridian Conference, where an international reference point was established based on the Greenwich or Prime Meridian located at the British Royal Observatory in Greenwich, England. Thus was laid the groundwork for the imposition of Universal Time, linked directly to an expanding British Empire upon which the sun never set and time could now pass in smooth and uniform succession. On a more prosaic level, replacing multiple time zones with uniform one-hour intervals was a means to coordinate and facilitate commercial rail traffic, indicating the extent to which attempts at standardization are connected to economic development.
This system has long had anti-colonial outliers (India, Iran and Nepal being among the countries using a so-called “offset” time zone). Recent attempts to break from Universal Time also indicate a nationalist agenda—as was the case in 2007 when Hugo Chavez established a unique time zone for Venezuela, or earlier this year when Russia abdicated unilaterally from daylight savings time, necessitating a complex re-shuffling of its international rail links.

While these occasional rebellions against time’s normative passage might appear consequential, in the west little has interrupted a regime that, starting from the industrial revolution, ceaselessly ordered and re-ordered the procession of daily life, developing such institutions as the five-day workweek, two-day weekend, 8-hour workday, and the Christian ceremonial calendar to differentiate productive time from leisure time, private time from public time, sacred time from profane time. No moment in this calendrical regime is as singularly fraught as New Year’s Eve, where popping champagne corks and passionate kisses are calibrated to an arbitrary moment based on longstanding international agreements concerning what time it is. Anna Lundh has proposed an ambitious plan to break with this regime, establishing a unique time zone one and a half hours behind normal Stockholm time to be observed New Year’s Eve at an event hosted by Evening Standard. By suggestion alone, Lundh will create a temporal enclave, a moment when celebrants can divorce themselves from this long-established apparatus of control, linking chronopolitics directly with the dance floor.


Text by Michael Baers
Mark