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Current


Toril Johannessen
SKOGSAKEN (The Forest Case)

Coming up


Lina Viste Grønli
Nye skulpturer


Maria Brinch
Inya Lake


Exhibitions
— 2019



Marysia Lewandowska It’s About Time (in Venice Biennial)


Films by
Mai Hofstad Gunnes



Isme Film
Collectively Conscious Remembrance



Trond Lossius
Jeremy Welsh
The Atmospherics
River deep, mountain high



Exhibitions 
— 2018



Marjolijn Dijkman
Toril Johannessen
Reclaiming Vision

Damir Avdagic
Reenactment/Process
Reprise/Response


Eivind Egeland
Father of Evil

Marysia Lewandowska
Rehearsing the Museum


Anton Vidokle
Immortality for All: a film trilogy on
Russian Cosmism

Curated by
Ingrid Haug Erstad

Johanna Billing
Pulheim Jam Session,
I’m Gonna Live Anyhow Until I die,
I’m Lost Without Your Rhythm, This is How We Walk on the Moon,
Magical World


Jenine Marsh
Kneading Wheel, 
Coins and Tokens

Jenine Marsh
Sofia Eliasson
Lasse Årikstad
Johanna Lettmayer
Lewis & Taggar
Jon Benjamin Tallerås
Orientering 
—  a group show in public space


Jon Rafman
Dream Journal
2016-2017


Goutam Ghosh &
Jason Havneraas
PAARA

Ian Giles
After BUTT

Films by Yafei Qi
Wearing The Fog, 
I Wonder Why, 
Life Tells Lies

Exhibitions
— 2017

Daniel Gustav Cramer
Five Days

Kamilla Langeland
Sjur Eide Aas
The Thinker, Flower Pot and Mush

Danilo Correale
Equivalent Unit
Reverie: On the Liberation from Work


Valentin Manz
Useful Junk

Jeannine Han
Dan Riley
Time Flies When Slipping Counter-Clockwise

Pedro Gómez-Egaña
Pleasure

Ane Graff
Mattering Waves


Andrew Amorim
Lest We Perish

Tom S. Kosmo
Unnatural Selection

Jenine Marsh
Lindsay Lawson

Dear Stranger


Exhibitions
— 2016


ALBUM
Eline Mugaas
Elise Storsveen
How to Feel Like a Woman

DKUK (Daniel Kelly)
Presents: Jóhanna Ellen
Digital Retreat Dot Com

Cato Løland
Folded Lines, Battles and Events

Harald Beharie
Louis Schou-Hansen
(S)kjønn safari 2.0

Lynda Benglis
On Screen
Bergen Assembly

Linn Pedersen
Bjørn Mortensen
Terence Koh
NADA New York

Ida Nissen
Kamilla Langeland
Marthe Elise Stramrud
Christian Tunge
Eivind Egeland
Fading Forms

Anders Holen
Stimulus

Sinta Werner
Vanishing Lines

Exhibitions
— 2015


Bjørn Mortensen
Pouches and Pockets
/ Compositories in Color


Linn Pedersen
Plain Air

Øystein Klakegg
Entrée # 55

Leander Djønne
Petroglyphs of the Indebted Man

Lewis & Taggart
Black Holes and other painted objects


Azar Alsharif
Bjørn Mortensen
Steinar Haga Kristensen
Lewis & Taggart
Vilde Salhus Røed
Heidi Bjørgan
NADA New York

Linda Sormin
Heidi Bjørgan
Collision

Steinar Haga Kristensen
The Fundamental Part of Any Act

Exhibitions
—2014


Tora Endestad Bjørkheim
Bjørn-Henrik Lybeck


Mathijs van Geest
The passenger eclipsed the object that I could have seen otherwise

Marit Følstad
Sense of Doubt

Oliver Laric
Yuanmingyuan3D

Terence Koh
sticks, stones and bones 

Kristin Tårnesvik
Espen Sommer Eide
Korsmos ugressarkiv

Exhibitions
— 2013


André Tehrani
Lost Allusions


Pedro Gómez-Egaña
Object to be Destroyed


Flag New York City

Christian von Borries
I’m M
Institute of Political Hallucinations
Bergen Assembly

Dillan Marsh
June Twenty-First

Vilde Salhus Røed
For the Sake of Colour


Azar Alsharif
The distant things seem close (…) the close remote (…) the air is loaded


Magnhild Øen Nordahl
Omar Johnsen
Trialog

Lars Korff Lofthus
New Work

Exhibitions
— 2012


Anngjerd Rustan
The Dust Will Roll Together

Cato Løland
Oliver Pietsch
Love is Old, Love is New

Stian Ådlandsvik
Abstract Simplicity of Need

Sinta Werner
Something that stands for Something / Double Described Tautologies

Kjersti Vetterstad
Lethargia

Anna Lundh
Grey Zone

Arne Rygg
Borghild Rudjord Unneland
Lisa Him-Jensen
Cato Løland
Lewis & Taggart
Klara Sofie Ludvigsen
Magnhild Øen Nordahl
Mathijs van Geest
Andrea Spreafico
Flag Bergen

Exhibitions
— 2011


Karen Skog & Mia Øquist
Skog & Øquist systematiserer

Danilo Correale
We Are Making History

Sveinung Rudjord Unneland
U.T.

Ethan Hayes-Chute
Make/Shifted Cabin

Ebba Bohlin
Per-Oskar Leu
Kaia Hugin
Pica Pica

Gabriel Kvendseth
First We Take Mannahatta

Roger von Reybekiel
Do Everything Fantastic

Exhibitions
— 2010



Michael Johansson
27m3

Tone Wolff Kalstad
This Color Is Everywhere


Knud Young Lunde
Road Show Event Plan


Alison Carey
Ivan Twohig
Benjamin Gaulon
On The In-Between


Mercedes Mühleisen
Øyvind Aspen
Birk Bjørlo
Damir Avdagic
Annette Stav Johanssen
If Everything Else Fails...

Mart
Ciara Scanlan
Matthew Nevin
An Instructional

Patrick Wagner
Nina Nowak
Samuel Seger Patricia Wagner
South of No North

Gandt
Agnes Nedregaard Midskills
Patrick Coyle
Boogey Boys Santiago Mostyn
Bergen Biennale 2010 by Ytter

Lars Korff Lofthus
West Norwegian Pavilion


Serina Erfjord
Repeat


Mattias Arvastsson
Presence No.5


Malin Lennström-Örtwall
It`s like Nothing Ever Happened

Exhibitions
— 2009


Tor Navjord
FM/AM

Ragnhild Johansen
Erased Knot Painting


Entrée Radio


Lewis and Taggart
Ledsagende lydspor


In Conversation:
Gómez-Egaña and Mathijs van Geest


In Conversation:
Andrew Amorim and Mitch Speed


In Conversation:
Ane Graff and Alex Klein


In Conversation:
Martin Clark and Daniel Kelly


Ludo Sounds with
Tori Wrånes




In Conversation:
Stine Janvin Motland, Kusum Normoyle, Mette Rasmussen, Cara Stewart



Randi Grov Berger
Contact/Info/CV
Other projects







Mark
May 12th - July 1st, 2018

Jenine Marsh
Kneading Wheels
Coins and Tokens



A coin is many things: an object of exchange and value; a metal disk held close to the body in hand or wallet or pocket; or a miniature, portable relief sculpture. Coins mark out a narrow space where symbolic and material worlds coexist in dense proximity. Received as change, gifts or tips, bought from the bank or in flea markets, lost and found, saved and spent, they come from everywhere, go everywhere.






Since I was a kid, like lots of kids, I have flattened coins on train tracks. I lay them down in long rows on the track and wait. Sometimes I’ll wait hours with a beer and the smells of milkweed and train oil. The weight will come on slowly, snaking forward with underground tones that send me back to the tall grasses. Huge and sudden, the engine comes, chased by the incredible noise of closed cars rattling like they’ll shake apart and wheels hammering down on rail joints, metal on metal. There is an extra noise when the wheels pass over the coins, pounded by a momentum that could cut a truck in two. Endless cars crash and roll by, and then are gone, taking the noise with them. The crickets resume and I search the rocks for scattered coins, greasy faceless smears of copper, silver and gold.

Sometimes fenced in with chain-link and barbed wire, sometimes bordered by the blank backsides of warehouses, and sometimes left open like an unhealing scar, train tracks cut through cities like rusty blades. Even stray dogs steer clear. Everybody knows that when the engine plunges through, a careless trespasser will be diced into mulch. But in a city lacking green space, some are still drawn to the narrow and endlessly long wastelands of untended scrub and steel. In cities, where public space is the most policed and where private space must be rented, train tracks and the deprived currency-conversion enacted there provide an illicit liminality. Destruction makes space. And although it is narrow, unbelievably thin, is it there. A gap in the fence.

Spare change rolls around the earth. Paid with change, and returned as change, back and forth, exchanging and unchanging, forever. Like a wheel rolls between track and carriage, a coin rolls between exchange and value, mobilizing and materializing as it goes. But a coin is of such a small matter that sometimes it can slip out from this circuitous route. It can escape through a hole in a pocket, behind a dresser, down a well or into a pond as a polluting wish, or be accidentally sent to the landfill along with an emptied pocket’s debris. When crossing borders it can become a souvenir, and when officially discontinued, as the Canadian Penny was in 2012, it can become dead weight. These lost, decommissioned or train-flattened coins remember other things it can do – it can be a screwdriver, two coins can open a beer bottle, and a coin with a hole in it is a washer. It can scratch a lottery ticket, level a wobbly table, or wedge an old window shut. A derailed object can be a tool, but always an improvised one; a hack and a trick.

Derailed coins like these are wheels without cart or carriage or track, that may roll willy-nilly, enjoying a wilder objecthood. They can slip from the loop, out through an impossible gap between system and symbol, exchange and value, track and train. The reeking strips of weed indifferently slice through city and wilderness, borders and properties, behind and in-between. And the derailed wheel rolls its weird blade, just as a snake cuts the grass.

Text by Jenine Marsh, May 2018



//

Jenine Marsh (b.1984, Calgary, Canada) is based in Toronto. She has exhibited her work in numerous venues including COOPER COLE, Toronto; Lulu, Mexico City; ASHES/ASHES, Los Angeles; Hannah Hoffman Gallery, Los Angeles; CK2, New York; 8-11, Toronto; Fourteen30, Portland OR; Entrée, Bergen, (NO) and Gianni Manhattan, Vienna (AUT). She participated in residencies at the Banff Centre (CA); Rupert, Vilnius (LTU); SOMA, Mexico City (MX) and is currently artist-in-residency at USF Verftet in Bergen (NO).












Mark